Posted by on September 18, 2017 4:15 pm
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Categories: Asia corporatism Economy Globalist Agenda Jon Rappoport Liberty Politics trade

By Jon Rappoport

And the unknown trade deal that cost the US a hundred thousand jobs

This isn’t one of the big trade deals everybody knows about.

This one was launched during the glorious Obama years:

The (South) Korea Free Trade Agreement.

Signed, sealed, and delivered by Obama in 2011 with his assurance that it would create 70,000 American jobs.

His assurance was on the level of his promise that, under Obamacare, you would be able to choose your own doctor.

Four years later, in 2016, this was the outcome of the Globalist Korea Free Trade Agreement, as reported by Public Citizen:

“…the loss of more than 102,554 American jobs.”

Oops. Slight miscalculation.

“U.S. goods exports to Korea have dropped 10 percent, or $4.5 billion…”

Sorry about that.

“U.S. imports of goods from Korea have increased 18 percent, or $10.8 billion…”

Sorry about that, too.

How could this have happened? I’ll tell you how. It’s simple. Despite claims, these trade deals are written and calculated to torpedo economies. That’s what Globalists do.

Why?

Because an ultimate top-down takeover of populations is easier that way.

Here’s another example: NAFTA. Remember that trade treaty? It enabled, among other consequences, the export of very cheap corn—massive amounts—from the US to Mexico. Result? 1.5 million Mexican corn farmers were thrown out of business. Boom. Many of them decided to come across the border to the US.

Does that sound like an all-around economy-building scenario?

Globalism: the wolf in sheep’s clothing.

No more countries—only elite corporations in control, making markets wherever they can find them…

There’s just one problem. As these corporations and their Globalist leaders play economic game with countries and their people, the net effect is decreasing the number of customers who can afford to buy the corporations’ products.

You can’t just shift the beneficiaries of trade deals from one nation to another, in an unending shuffle and reshuffle of the deck. Sooner or later, you wind up with more sellers than buyers.

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