Posted by on August 25, 2017 4:07 pm
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Categories: Alphabet Inc. apple Business Department of Justice DOJ donald trump Economy Economy of the United States Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution Google Internet privacy Law Privacy concerns regarding Google Supreme Court Technology World Wide Web

Via The Daily Bell

The DOJ Wants to Know Who Visited Anti-Trump Website

The Department of Justice is seeking the IP addresses of 1.3 million people who visited a website organizing anti-Trump protests at the inauguration.

The warrant is in connection with hundreds of prosecutions from “rioters” who were arrested while protesting the inauguration.

But the web host already provided details in accordance with a narrower subpoena for the information of those arrested. Such a broad sweeping search is completely in violation of rights.

Could the move be the start of a Trump enemies list?

Don’t Want To be in the Union? That’s Fine, but Pay Up

Unions pretend to provide a stable and safe working environment, but really they prevent it. A court ruled that a bus driver was contractually obligated to pay union dues, even though she was not in the union.

So if she wants to work, she is bullied into signing whatever documents the Teamsters tell her.

You want the job? Pay protection money.

Say What? Google Argues to Protect User Data From Prying Government Eyes

It’s not every day you see Google and other big data companies arguing in favor of Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure.

In a Supreme Court case, companies like Google and Apple have encouraged the court to rule that the Fourth Amendment does indeed protect electronic data from government seizure without a warrant. Information such as location and call meta-data cannot simply be taken at will by law enforcement, they argued.

The companies said users consider the information private, even if they allow it to be collected and viewed by the likes of Google and Apple. It is good to see big companies fighting for individual rights, especially with the immense power they hold because of the data they collect from us.

But does Google really care about your privacy from the government? Or is this just a meaningless nod to convince users not to be suspicious?

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